Automatisk udkast

Læs os | Lyt til os | Se os | Tilslutte Live Events | Slå annoncer fra | Levende |

Klik på dit sprog for at oversætte denne artikel:

Afrikaans Afrikaans Albanian Albanian Amharic Amharic Arabic Arabic Armenian Armenian Azerbaijani Azerbaijani Basque Basque Belarusian Belarusian Bengali Bengali Bosnian Bosnian Bulgarian Bulgarian Catalan Catalan Cebuano Cebuano Chichewa Chichewa Chinese (Simplified) Chinese (Simplified) Chinese (Traditional) Chinese (Traditional) Corsican Corsican Croatian Croatian Czech Czech Danish Danish Dutch Dutch English English Esperanto Esperanto Estonian Estonian Filipino Filipino Finnish Finnish French French Frisian Frisian Galician Galician Georgian Georgian German German Greek Greek Gujarati Gujarati Haitian Creole Haitian Creole Hausa Hausa Hawaiian Hawaiian Hebrew Hebrew Hindi Hindi Hmong Hmong Hungarian Hungarian Icelandic Icelandic Igbo Igbo Indonesian Indonesian Irish Irish Italian Italian Japanese Japanese Javanese Javanese Kannada Kannada Kazakh Kazakh Khmer Khmer Korean Korean Kurdish (Kurmanji) Kurdish (Kurmanji) Kyrgyz Kyrgyz Lao Lao Latin Latin Latvian Latvian Lithuanian Lithuanian Luxembourgish Luxembourgish Macedonian Macedonian Malagasy Malagasy Malay Malay Malayalam Malayalam Maltese Maltese Maori Maori Marathi Marathi Mongolian Mongolian Myanmar (Burmese) Myanmar (Burmese) Nepali Nepali Norwegian Norwegian Pashto Pashto Persian Persian Polish Polish Portuguese Portuguese Punjabi Punjabi Romanian Romanian Russian Russian Samoan Samoan Scottish Gaelic Scottish Gaelic Serbian Serbian Sesotho Sesotho Shona Shona Sindhi Sindhi Sinhala Sinhala Slovak Slovak Slovenian Slovenian Somali Somali Spanish Spanish Sudanese Sudanese Swahili Swahili Swedish Swedish Tajik Tajik Tamil Tamil Telugu Telugu Thai Thai Turkish Turkish Ukrainian Ukrainian Urdu Urdu Uzbek Uzbek Vietnamese Vietnamese Welsh Welsh Xhosa Xhosa Yiddish Yiddish Yoruba Yoruba Zulu Zulu

Undersøger bruger falske dokumenter til at få pas

0a_19
0a_19
Avatar
Skrevet af editor

WASHINGTON – Using phony documents and the identities of a dead man and a 5-year-old boy, a government investigator obtained U.S. passports in a test of post-9/11 security.

WASHINGTON – Using phony documents and the identities of a dead man and a 5-year-old boy, a government investigator obtained U.S. passports in a test of post-9/11 security. Despite efforts to boost passport security since the 2001 terror attacks, the investigator fooled passport and postal service employees four out of four times, according to a new report made public Friday.

The report by the Government Accountability Office, Congress’ investigative arm, details the ruses:

_One investigator used the Social Security number of a man who died in 1965, a fake New York birth certificate and a fake Florida driver’s license. He received a passport four days later.

_A second attempt had the investigator using a 5-year-old boy’s information but identifying himself as 53 years old on the passport application. He received that passport seven days later.

_In another test, an investigator used fake documents to get a genuine Washington, D.C., identification card, which he then used to apply for a passport. He received it the same day.

_A fourth investigator used a fake New York birth certificate and a fake West Virginia driver’s license and got the passport eight days later.

Criminals and terrorists place a high value on illegally obtained travel documents, U.S. intelligence officials have said. Currently, poorly faked passports are sold on the black market for $300, while top-notch fakes go for around $5,000, according to Immigration and Customs Enforcement investigations.

The State Department has known about this vulnerability for years. On February 26, the State Department’s deputy assistant secretary of passport services issued a memo to Passport Services directors across the country stating that the agency is reviewing its processes for issuing passports because of “recent events regarding several passport applications that were approved and issued in error.”

In the memo, obtained by The Associated Press, Brenda Sprague said that in 2009 passport services would focus on the quality, not the quantity, of its passport issuance decisions. Typically, passport services officials are evaluated on how many passports they issue. Instead, Sprague said, the specialists should focus all their efforts on improving the integrity of the process, including “a renewed emphasis for Passport Specialists on recognizing authentic documents and fraud indicators on applications.”

Over the past seven years, U.S. officials have tried to increase passport security and make it more difficult to apply with fake documents.

But these tests show the State Department — which processes applications and issues passports — does not have the ability to ensure that supporting documents are legitimate, said Janice Kephart, an expert on travel document security who worked on the 9/11 Commission report.

Kephart said this is the same problem that enabled some of the 9/11 hijackers to use fake documents to get Virginia driver’s licenses, which they used to board airplanes. Since 2001, states have taken measures to make driver’s licenses more secure.

“We have to address the … document issue in a very big way, and we have yet to do that across the board,” Kephart said.

State Department spokesman Richard Aker said the agency regrets that it issued these four passports.

“The truth is that this was human error,” Aker said.

He said the State Department plans to have facial recognition screening for all applicants in six months. The agency is also talking to states to see if passport officials can check states’ electronic databases to verify licenses and identification cards.

Two members of the Senate Judiciary’s terrorism and homeland security subcommittee requested the investigation.

“It’s very troubling that in the years since the September 11 attacks someone could use fraudulent documents to obtain a U.S. passport,” Sen. Jon Kyl, R-Ariz., said in a statement.

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., said the report confirmed her fears that U.S. passports aren’t secure.

“These passports can be used to purchase a weapon, fly overseas, or open a fraudulent bank account,” Feinstein said. “This puts our nation in grave danger.”